Technology

IPv6 Adoption Continue to Vary Across Nations

IPv6 adoption is a major issue in the world of information technology. Each device that connects to the Internet needs a unique IP address, but the current IPv4 standard simply does not have enough of them to keep up with demand. IPv6 can solve that problem, but transitioning to it is a significant project. The effort involved has kept many people from switching over, but that is starting to change. However, the rate of adoption varies significantly from one nation to the next, and some parts of the world are falling behind.

Top Performers

Europe is leading the way when it comes to IPv6 adoptions. Belgium has been leading the adoption efforts by a significant margin, but several other nations are close behind it. Greece, Switzerland, and Germany have also made significant efforts to adopt IPv6, although none of the nations have managed to have an adoption rate of at least fifty percent according to the majority of sources.

While Europe is home to the majority of leading countries, there are a few in other parts of the world. The Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago has managed to keep pace with the leading nations and has surpassed many European countries in spite of its small size. The United States has done just as well, Brazil is doing comparably to many of the European nations in the middle of the pack, and Canada only falls outside of the top ten rapid adopters by a small margin. The majority of the rest of the countries in the Americas have significantly lower rates of adoption, largely due to their relative poverty. Asia shows lower rates of adoption than Europe and the Americas, but India has still managed to earn a place in the top ten. The experts at www.bluecatnetworks.com are capable of providing you with further information.

African Support

Africa has fallen behind many other parts of the world in regard to IPv6 adoption, but there is evidence that suggests that will change in the near future. Chris Ujawe, a leading technological executive, recently spoke on the topic as part of a IPv6 panel at a recent conference in Geneva, Switzerland.

Ujawe took the opportunity to emphasize the importance of IPv6 adoption for the development of the African economy. His position is that any African nation which fails to adopt the new standard will fall behind the rest of the world and suffer a serious disadvantage during economic competitions. Some African nations, such as Nigeria, are making efforts to adopt the new standard, but Ujawe does not believe that they have been sufficient so far. To the contrary, he believes that the current situation should be considered a technological emergency. It remains to be seen if his plea for a greater focus on IPv^ will be heard, but it may lead to rapid adoption in Africa’s future.

What You Need To Know About The DNS Firewall

DNS: The Connective Tissue Of The Internet

Canadian businesses are typically fairly knowledgeable and savvy when it comes to technology. By necessity, however, most businesspeople do not have intimate knowledge of the behind-the-scenes processes that make the internet work. Hopefully, more Canadian businesspeople will learn about the salutary advantages of using a DNS firewall. To fully explain what you should know about the DNS firewall, it is helpful to start with a quick primer on DNS. Also called the domain name system, DNS is essentially the connective tissue of the internet. A kind of virtual address book, DNS is the fundamental technology that allows your browser to find your favorite websites. To a layperson, using the web is as simple as typing in something like “MyFavoriteWebsite.Com.” On a basic level, however, internet IP addresses look like this: 4.382.43.99. DNS is the system that converts the alphanumeric URL you type into the numeric IP address that truly identifies a remote server in the network.

A New Type Of Firewall That Works

A DNS firewall is a tool that harnesses the power of DNS routing for your benefit. Normally, you would rely on your internet provider to handle all DNS routing. In most respects, ISPs are authoritative institutions that you can trust. However, most ISPs still treat all DNS requests equally and without discrimination. This means that your ISP will not interfere if you accidentally direct your browser to a known malicious site. Neither will the ISP normally take action to stop incoming DNS traffic from suspicious hosts. Hopefully, ISPs will learn how to better balance impartial traffic management with the security needs of clients. You may be able to learn more at the www.bluecatnetworks.com website.

Using a DNS firewall, you can proactively introduce selectivity into the way your system interacts with remote servers. Available as a hardware device or a software solution, the DNS firewall automatically blocks all incoming DNS requests from known bad actors. Just as importantly, the DNS firewall (DNSF) provides you with the tools you need to identify and block intrusions from malicious sites that were previously unidentified.

DNS-Based Hacking: A Growing Threat

Securing a DNSF could represent one of the most important investments you’ll ever make for your business. Because security researchers have closed many of the loopholes that previously abetted hackers, DNS-based attacks are increasingly important components of the hacking toolbox. DNS signalling is one off the most alarming ploys in DNS-based hacking. Put simply, DNS signalling is a kind of false messaging that can allow malicious parties to literally take control of your DNS requests. Hackers can use DNS signalling to direct you to malicious, counterfeit web servers. With a DNSF, you can protect yourself from this and many other related hacker tactics.

Why The World Needs More Open Source DNS Servers

Introducing Collaborative Software

By now, domain name system (DNS) servers have achieved a fair amount of exposure in the public eye. This is largely due to the fact that unknown hacker groups have brazenly used distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks to bring many DNS servers to a crashing halt. Since these hacking attacks regularly make front-page news, the general public is more aware than ever that DNS is the backbone of the Web. However, far fewer people realize that the Internet needs more open source domain name service if DDoS is to become a rare occurrence once more.

Although for-profit DNS providers work hard to foil hackers, certain aspects of corporate governance stand in the way of unfettered technical innovation. For-profit tech companies naturally tend to be secretive about the inner workings of their infrastructures. Since commercial DNS providers and security firms compete directly, each company sees only a small part of the larger picture when it comes to cybersecurity. Even including major national governments, nonprofits only provide a small part of the overall pool of cybersecurity expertise. Since open source software is released to the public free of charge, open source development attracts idealistic cybersecurity experts who would otherwise remain in the shadows. Anyone is free to edit or add to open source software. In a unique and powerful way, open source programmers share crucial information about security risks.

The open source movement could do much to reduce the Internet’s vulnerability to DNS hijacking and DDoS attacks. This massive collaborative effort unites people from throughout the world. Whether one operates a true domain name server or a virtual one, open source provides a incomplete but welcome answer for insecurity. You can find more information at www.bluecatnetworks.com.

Using Open Source Domain Name Service To Counter ISPs

Although ISPs have every legal right to redirect users to any sites they wish, many users have complained about the way some ISPs brazenly hijack misspelled URLs. Some ISPs have partnerships with promotional sites and receive some financial rewards for redirecting users to their partners. Needless to say, this troubling occurrence is rare. Most ISPs engage in fully ethical and praiseworthy behavior.

Open source domain name servers allow people to take control of their online lives. It is highly possible that these open source servers will greatly multiply over time. While using one of these alternative servers requires altering a few router settings, most people of average intelligence can easily make these alterations with proper instructions. At least in North America, it seems clear that for-profit domain name software will remain completely dominant into the foreseeable future. However, every person who uses open source domain name software helps reverse this trend in a small but important way.